Day 19

From Saskatoon, we walked south today towards Regina, before turning north and heading up and crossing into Manitoba! We finished our 1,209.00 km day in Thompson, Manitoba. Also referred to as the Hub of the North, Thompson is an important city as it provides goods and services to many of the communities in Northern Manitoba. You can even see the northern lights occasionally from Thompson!

Be sure to record your walking times today, and share any photos or stories about your walks using #WalkTheWorldSO on social media!

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Day 18

Today we set off from Red Deer, Alberta and walked our way through Calgary (home of the Calgary Stampede) and Lethbridge before crossing over into Saskatchewan!  Our distance of 1,439.50 km places us in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan which is the largest city in Saskatchewan! The city gets its name from the saskatoon berry that is native to the region.

Be sure to record your walking times today, and share any photos or stories about your walks using #WalkTheWorldSO on social media!

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Day 17

Welcome to Alberta!

We are back! And what a welcome we have received – check out the video for a welcome message from Special Olympics athletes across Alberta!

Our trip today involved a bit of a hike along the Slave River and Athabasca River before arriving in Fort McMurray, Alberta. From there, we walked to the provincial capital Edmonton, home of the biggest mall in North America (the West Edmonton Mall) that also includes an indoor water park and amusement park! From there we headed south to Red Deer, Alberta and are now expecting to pass through Calgary and Lethbridge tomorrow! We made it 1,609.25 km today!

Be sure to record your walking times today, and share any photos or stories about your walks using #WalkTheWorldSO on social media!

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Day 16

After walking 947.00 km today, we’ve stopped in Fort Smith, Northwest Territories – Fort Smith is a community located along the Slave River and is right next the border with Alberta. There are plenty of rapids along the river near Fort Smith, and during the summer, pelicans are often seen nested around the river. There are even whooping cranes who nest there, which are an endangered species!

Be sure to record your walking times today, and share any photos or stories about your walks using #WalkTheWorldSO on social media!

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Day 15

We are back on the mainland! After looping around to visit some interesting destinations on the island of Nunavut, we’ve returned to the mainland and are now at the Nunavut-Manitoba border on the coast of Hudson Bay. We walked 827.50 km to get here today, and there’s still a bit more off-roading in store for tomorrow, but soon we’ll be back to Alberta and we know a lot of Special Olympics athletes and supporters have been participating in the walk so far and are looking forward to welcoming us as we pass through!

Be sure to record your walking times today, and share any photos or stories about your walks using #WalkTheWorldSO on social media!

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Day 14

Today we reached Coral Harbour, Nunavut on our walk around the world! We walked 1,220.00 km together, which puts our total distance  walked at almost 15,000km! This small hamlet is located on Southampton Island and is named for the fossilized coral found in the water around the island. Interestingly, Coral Harbour is the only community in Nunavut that does not observe Daylight Savings Time – instead, it remains on Eastern Standard Time (EST) year round. Does this mean we did a bit of time travel to get here???

Be sure to record your walking times today, and share any photos or stories about your walks using #WalkTheWorldSO on social media!

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Day 13

Our next stop is Iqaluit, Nunavut – the largest community in Nunavut and the only city in the territory! Nunavut was first established in 1999 when the Northwest Territories was divided into the two territories, and Iqaluit was designated as the capital city of Nunavut. There are actually no roads or railway routes connected Nunavut to the rest of Canada, and even connections by ship are limited for parts of the year! We walked 1,474.75 km together today, so let’s keep up the great work and keep submitting your time!

Be sure to record your walking times today, and share any photos or stories about your walks using #WalkTheWorldSO on social media!

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The Wideman’s are Walking with a Purpose

Preston and Carol Wideman have been walking for years, no matter the time of the year or where they are at – and during this period of physical distancing they continue to stay active.

Preston is a Special Olympics Alberta athlete and Carol, his mom, is the Chairperson for the Camrose affiliate. They have been involved for 15 years with Preston participating in a multitude of sports including soccer, bocce, golf, basketball, 5-pin bowling, curling, swimming, functional fitness, softball, along with indoor & outdoor walk-run.

The walking program is one of the hallmarks of the Camrose affiliate, and one of their most important events each year is the Larry Gibson Memorial Walk-Run.

“Larry was a volunteer with SOA-Camrose, he helped establish the basketball program, he served on the affiliate, and assisted with fundraisers and events. Larry’s whole family has embraced Special Olympics and together with them, and the Camrose community we walk and run in memory of Larry to raise funds and bring awareness to SOA-Camrose.”

This year they adjusted the event to maintain physical distancing and the safety of their athletes, participants, and community members. Rather than host a congregated event, they spread it out over five days encouraging participants to just get out when they could.

Approximately 25 athletes walked community paths, trails, and even on their treadmills while remembering Larry. It was a huge success and for Carol it was important to connect with athletes to make sure they are staying active.

Preston says to all his fellow athletes, “stay healthy and stay active, walking is easy, even a little is better than none.”

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